Mzansi calls for ‘two months no weave’ challenge
Afika Peters

Following the slander black natural hair took from Clicks, many South Africans have coined a new challenge: ‘Two months, no weave’

What is the two months no weave challenge?

Twitter user Thabi (@thabi_skhonyane) may have said it in jest but her suggestion for black women to boycott weaves for two months was not taken lightly.

The aim of the challenge, it seems, is for black women to starve cosmetics and hair care businesses of income by staging a two-month stay-away.

This comes at the height of tensions between EFF rioters and Clicks following the cosmetic giant’s racially triggering website blunder.

“How about we do the #2MonthsNoWeaveChallenge where we educate the world and embrace our beautiful hair that defies gravity?” Thabi asked in a tweet that has since gone viral.

Social media revolts against racism with natural hair challenge

The challenge was polarising. Some felt that this was an empowering method black women could take on to display their level of influence in the cosmetics and beauty industry.

Others, on the other hand, were offended by this apparent obsession with what the choices black women make about their hair.

“The preoccupation over what black women do with their hair and the burden placed on us to educate people and promote “acceptance” of something that’s accepted as a personal taste for everyone else is a distanction (sp). While we do the ‘two months no weave challenge’, other people are just living,” one user slammed.

Here are some reactions from the ‘two months, no weave’ challenge

In the end, the general consensus was against the ‘counterproductive’ challenge.

The numbers sure do support the latter. After all, Clicks’ share price has been unscathed by the recent racist advert scandal. This proves that, despite the shame that befell the cosmetics brand, the stock market still has faith in Clicks attracting the urban market once it has weathered this ferocious storm.