This is why South Africa celebrates Spring Day
Andile Sicetsha

Ever wondered why South Africans get all excited and rush to social media to update their affirmations on Spring Day?

Why does South Africa celebrate Spring Day?

Well, the simple answer is that the first of September marks the end of winter and the start of great tropical weather.

South Africa often starts seeing an increase in international arrivals around this time. The weather conditions, matched with our prideful scenic environments make our country one of the best travel destinations in the world.

Of course, the advent of the deadly coronavirus (Covid-19) may have stricken all of that off the board, at least for this year.

Still, the magic of the spring season permeates on 1 September. There is an unexplained energy that reverberates and more often, this is accompanied by great weather conditions, marking the start of longer and sunny days.

Unfortunately, there is no historical significance attached to Mzansi’s celebration of Spring Day. We are a nation of jolly folk and nothing gets us going than warm weather.

We have some of the best beaches in the world and spring offers us great incentive to dust off our swimwear and hit the waves.

Is 1 September the start of the spring season?

However, the actual fact about Spring Day is, the season has not ‘sprung’ yet.

Britannica explains it perfectly. You see, the spring season officially starts on Tuesday 22 September.

This period is also known as the vernal equinox, a moment in the year when “the sun is exactly above the equator and day and night are of equal length.”

“Also, either of the two points in the sky where the ecliptic (the Sun’s annual pathway) and the celestial equator intersect,” the publication notes.

In the northern hemisphere, the spring equinox happens on 21 March, when the sun moves north across the celestial equator.

South Africans have taken to social media in celebration of Spring Day and these are some of the best reactions we picked: